How the Sharing Economy Can Create Value from Waste

Erasmus Wambua, a schoolboy, looks at a single electric lightbulb, powered by M-Kopa solar technology, as it illuminates his home in Ndela village, Machakos county, in Kenya, on Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Customers agree to pay for the solar panel with regular instalments which M-Kopa, a Nairobi-based provider of solar-lighting systems, then monitors for payments that are made using a mobile-phone money-transfer service. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Erasmus Wambua, a schoolboy, looks at a single electric lightbulb, powered by M-Kopa solar technology, as it illuminates his home in Ndela village, Machakos county, in Kenya, on Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Customers agree to pay for the solar panel with regular instalments which M-Kopa, a Nairobi-based provider of solar-lighting systems, then monitors for payments that are made using a mobile-phone money-transfer service. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images

I couldn’t agree more with the point that Jeremy Rifkin makes in the third part of his series on the Third Industrial Revolution — countries that entered the 21st century with the most minimal infrastructure stand to gain the most in the coming decades. The benefits of building a state-of-the-art distributed infrastructure from the bottom up far outweigh the liabilities faced in starting from scratch.

Read the full story at The Huffington Post

2016-12-08T20:56:01+00:00November 11th, 2015|Tags: |